Category Archives: The Avengers

What if The Avengers Were a 1950s Matinee?

I just came across this wonderful fan work called a ‘Premake’ using old movie clips to create a 50s Matinee style B-Film trailer of Joss Whedon‘s The Avengers.

It’s really a Marvellous creation (pun intended) using clips from the Day The Earth Stood Still and the 60s Brit Fantasy Spy series: The Avengers, among others, to create the perfect trailer. Have a watch. It will blow your mind in the best way.

Until Next Time, Extremites, I remain: Julian Munds

Enhanced by Zemanta

Paul Bettany to Portray The Vision to Appear in Avengers 2

Naturally Uncanny Reviews!

vision-paul-bettany

Kudos for you who saw this coming (and my condolences to those still hoping that it would be Agent Coulson). Today, it has been announced that Paul Bettany will be playing The Vision in the upcoming Avengers movie: Marvel’s ‘Avengers: Age of Ultron. For those unfamiliar with Bettany, you may have seen him in films such as The DaVinci Code, A Beautiful Mind, and A Knight’s Tale. But he isn’t new to the realm of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, since he’s also the voice of Tony Stark’s armor AI, JARVIS.

I feel this is a logical approach for introducing The Vision for the Marvel movies, since JARVIS has been part of the MCU since Iron Man 1. Also, Bettany has the chops to pull off the wall-phasing android. If you agree or disagree, let us know in the comments.

Source:
http://variety.com/2014/film/news/paul-bettany-to-play-the-vision-in-marvels-avengers-age-of-ultron-1201090635/

View original post

Will Agent Coulson Return in ‘Avengers 2′?

This is now entirely a possibility as Agents of SHIELD has established Coulson as a major player in the goings on of the near mortals. Even much more so then his prior involvement in the films.

Enhanced by Zemanta

iCosplay Blog

agent-coulson-SHIELD

It’s common knowledge that, one way or another, Agent Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) got better after apparently snuffing it in the first Avengers flick, and is now alive and well and starring in Marvel‘s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series….But where does Nerddom’s favorite soft-spoken spook stand regarding the upcoming sequel, Avengers: Age Of Ultron?

Well, let’s see what The Whedonizer said when WPRI asked if Coulson would return:

“He could. Right now it’s not something I’m pursuing because I have so much going on in Avengers 2. Finding out that Coulson is alive would be an entire B story. And I already have too much movie. That’s better than the other thing.”

According to the info revealed at SDCC, The Avengers don’t have the security clearance to know that Coulson is still among the living, so it would take a bit of doing to shoehorn…

View original post 41 more words

Inside the Hierarchy of the Avengers

Journey Into Marvel

The Story I read: “The Coming of the Avengers” (The Avengers #1 Sept, 1963)

Even the cover seems reverential.

Even the cover seems reverential.

If there are checkpoints in this quest, the premiere of the Avengers would be the first. This is the moment that a loose knit group of ragtag characters became beings that inhabited a whole far reaching world. Sure, there had been crossovers before this, but they always seemed to be special events that were often hastily written exhibitions stemming from fan requests. This issue, however, is the moment that showed Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and the other Marvel creatives wanted to construct a vast comic gallery that would be able to compete with the massive and older DC counterpart. Reading this story felt almost like a religious moment; if comic fandom could be considered such.

This story reveals a glimpse into how the Silver Age Marvel world works. On the face of  this issue, it resembles a caper flick, not unlike The Dirty Dozen. A group of rag tag Superheros come together to defeat a common enemy.

Thus enters the Incredible Hulk. 

…Wait a minute. The antagonist is actually Loki. Never mind that, neither Ant-Man, Wasp, or Iron-Man can pose any threat to the trickster god so only Thor confronts him. The rest pursue the supposed villainous Hulk only to find out that he is not such a bad guy. He’s just a circus performing monster who was the victim of an Asgardian plot.

I wasted 20 pages on this?

This is the problem of Hulk and probably the reason for his lack of success in the period; he is too believable as the villain. He is a selfish, violent monster, who is out for his own survival. Not to mention he is a malady to Bruce Banner. Hulk is difficult to spin as a legitimate hero, for he lacks humanity and a moral code, the two prerequisites for a superhero. It is telling that the Disney Marvel film franchise has had such trouble translating the character to film, till Joss Whedon of course figured it out by making Jekyll and Hyde one: “I’m always angry.” – Says Mark Ruffalo’s Bruce.

In the Silver Age, Hulk was not the result of rage as depicted in modern Marvel but is a character that bares more resemblance to Jekyll/Hyde. Perhaps, it was the pages devoted to Thor’s solo adventure that hampered proper development for Big Green.

Thor’s contribution to this story bares more similarity to an issue of Journey Into Mystery then as a team up with the Avengers. The moment he found out that Loki had a plot to capture him he flew away to Asgard to fight. The three others duked it out on Earth. This is not the actions of a team mate. There is no group cohesion in this story and I blame it on haphazard writing. The group comes together out of happenstance which results in a themeless issue. This is not the case with the film, which was vaguely inspired by this plot, because of the creation of the S.H.I.E.L.D. assemblage.

I felt empty at the end of what should have been a fantastic experience.

I also wonder why it was these five characters that were chosen to be a part of the first Avengers crew. It makes sense that Dr. Strange is not included as he has only had two stories devoted to him, by this point, and, frankly, they were very odd. I doubt Stan Lee intended the good Doctor to be a common fixture. The Fantastic Four, though creatively mentioned in the story, have really nothing to do with the creation of the Avengers. This is strange as some time has been spent making the Four (particularly Jonny Storm) the flag ship line. Perhaps, their was a fear that the Four’s egos, the topic of my last review, would over power these less established characters. I for one would have enjoyed a Tony Stark comic lashing of Thing. I know it will come in the future.

Overall, this is a very messy issue with some really great action with Hulk, and some brilliant use of Ant-Man and Wasp, also some wonderful art by Kirby. Yet, there

The Teen Brigade gets bombarded by help.

The Teen Brigade gets bombarded by help.

is an absence of Iron-Man, wasted focus on Rick Jones and his Teen Brigade, and confusion as to the plot. I give this one a 3 out of 5. I flirted with a lower mark but it felt sacrilegious as this issue is so important and a gamble of an undertaking. This makes the endeavour as a whole, respectable.

<— Preceding Review: “A Skrull Walks Among Us!” (Fantastic Four #18, Sept 1963)

—>Upcoming Review: “Marked for Destruction by Dr. Doom” (The Amazing Spider-Man #5 Oct 1963)

%d bloggers like this: